Assorted bookworms




When I googled “bookworm,” almost the entire first page of hits concerned an online word game. The lone exception was for a long-running radio program about books. I suppose a fair amount of book clubs, book stores, book review newspaper columns, etc. have the name bookworm or bookworms. I even came across Bookworm Socks! And why not? Bookworm is a long establish idiom for someone who spends a lot of time reading or studying. I take it the term is not entirely complimentary, as in this illustration: ” The girl who would rather stay inside and read than go out … Continue reading






Libraries, ebooks, and the freedom to read




Libraries have long championed its patrons’ right to privacy. The American Library Association first adopted a document known as the Library Bill of Rights in 1939. Basically, it states that whatever anyone chooses to read is no one else’s business, and there is no good reason for the government or any other entity to interfere. Much more recently, librarians eagerly pursued means of lending ebooks to their patrons, only to find unexpected incompatibilities between doing so and freedom to read. Libraries and privacy Every once in a while, some spectacular criminal act will have people suggesting that maybe the police … Continue reading






Graphic novels at the library




The graphic novel is a strange beast in a way. It looks just like a comic book, except it usually has a stronger cover. Where a novel is definitely a form of fiction, a graphic novel can be any kind of narrative, even non-fiction. Oh well, “comic” books, which are really magazines, can have dramatic stories. The English language never has really made any sense, so why should we expect it to when it comes to graphic novels. The reason for this post is that libraries are collecting them seriously. Consider how many movies and TV shows have been based … Continue reading






Summer: a time for learning or forgetting?




Left to themselves over the summer, children will forget some of the reading and math skills they learned in school. That puts them behind where they ought to be when school starts up again. Students who really struggled in school lose even more skills, putting them even farther behind. As much as school children need unorganized play time during the summer, it’s not good to leave them entirely to themselves. Most if not all public libraries have summer reading programs. So do many school districts. At the very least, parents, grandparents, or concerned neighbors should encourage children to participate in … Continue reading






The importance of summer reading programs at the library




School’s out, or soon will be. “No more classes! No more books! No more teachers’ dirty looks!” That “no more books” part is a problem, though–especially if it lasts all summer. Libraries pick up the slack. Children who don’t read over the summer return in the fall having lost some of their reading ability. That puts them behind, or farther behind, their reading classmates–as much as two years behind by the time they finish sixth grade. Some children are bookworms. They will read all summer simply for the joy of it. Others struggle with reading in school, and of course … Continue reading